Monday, October 02, 2006

Nobel Prize, Baby!

Two American Scientists just won the Nobel Prize in medicine for their work on RNA interference.

Why should a historian care? Well, this historian recently spent a weekend with her good buddy, the Biochemistry Ph.D., who attempted to convince her and everyone else present that RNAi was the biggest thing since spliced bread. Or rather, sliced bread. And since all of us grad student types should stick together in the grand brotherhood and sisterhood of nerdiness, I celebrate this triumph.


ps.
His nerdiest shirt: a swirly design singing the praises of RNAi.
My nerdiest shirt: a picture of Karl Marx holding the Radical History Review, captioned, "Earn Big Money, become a historian." Oh, the irony!

5 Comments:

Anonymous Anonymous said...

The shirt said.... Mission RNAi from Sigma ....and it is the bomb:)

I'm glad for the pub and hopefully spouse and derm boy might learn a little basic science as well.

There are even some clinical trials using RNAi to treat disease. Delivery techniques need a lot of improvement before it will be practical.

biochemistry PhD

7:35 AM  
Anonymous derm boy said...

I spent enough time learning basic science. That is why we keep you around...to get our basic science fix.

We will let you figure out the science, but we will be the guys to put it to actual clinical use.

9:49 AM  
Blogger Quinn said...

So biochem boy does the work, and derm boy gets the glory and the money (and the groupies?)

10:12 AM  
Blogger Jade said...

After reading your post yesterday I had a weird dream which involved King Kong on the rampage at a facility in the jungle, and Col. Sheppard from Stargate Atlantis discussing how we had to find the scientist who was doing the RNAi study to stop it.

8:46 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

In exciting news my uncle won the Nobel prize in chemistry today. Not my real uncle...my academic uncle who joins his father (my academic grandfather) as the 6th father son pair to win Nobel Prizes. His father won for medicine in the late 1950's for his studies on DNA replication.
The son for work on transcription.

It was a clean sweep for the americans taking home the prize for medicine, physics and chemistry...doubt an american will win a peace prize this year:)

biochemistry boy

2:04 PM  

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